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Finally, let us be aware that a new cosmology requires an over-arching metaphor. For the mechanistic cosmology, this metaphor is a clock-like mechanism. Within the Eco-Cosmology that I have developed, the main metaphor of the universe is that of the sanctuary:9 we are its guardians and its dwellers; also its stewards, in the best sense of the term4 steward'. We are the guardians and stewards of the cosmic sanctuary within the matrix of unfolding evolution, which gives the raison d etre for our responsibility; for our care for our brothers and sisters, within the human family and within the biotic community; for our interactions with the universe at large (we are evolution conscious of itself, helping the cosmos to evolve further); for our valves, one of which is frugality, which means grace without waste; and for our ultimate strivings - in helping ourselves and evolution to arrive at Omega Point, or whatever name we use for the point of ultimate perfection by which we are somehow bound.

My central point is that the three constituents: cosmology, eschatology and value (or ethics) must be coherently connected together, must support each other, and must co-define each other. May I be presumptuous enough to notice that they are so connected in my Eco-philosophy? May I also point out that they are not so connected within Deep Ecology?

Conclusion

So, in conclusion, I shall observe that as admirable as the intentions of Deep Ecology (of the Californian School) are, its foundations are not deep enough, its assertions constantly beg questions, its cosmology leaves too much to be desired, and its spirituality is completely lacking. The umbrella Deep Ecology provides is definitely leaky. Without spirituality, there is no deeper justification of our eschatology - if, that is, we aim at an eschatology capable of transcending the consumer eschatology. Without assuming the significance of evolution, there is no meaningful way of ascribing significance to 'processes'. Yet, without processes, the idea of the seamless web of organic unity does not make sense. A new cosmology cannot be established by mere critique of old cosmologies.

Against the triviality, and constantly trivializing influence, of the old mechanistic world view, we have to have the courage to ask what is the meaning of the universe, what it takes delight in and what it abhors. The universe does not delight in just 'being'. It delights in life. The universe does not delight in life. It delights in consciousness. The universe does not delight in consciousness. It delights in love. The universe does not delight in love. It delights in us reaching the orbit of God.

When the primordial explosion of light becomes New Light in the shape of God, then the universe truly delights.

References: 1. Henryk Skolimowski, Eco-Philosophy: Designing New Tactics for Living, Marion Boyers, London, 1984. 2. Bill Devall and George Sessions, Deep Ecology, Living as if Nature Mattered, Gibbs M. Smith, 1984. 3. Henryk Skolimowski, Eco-Theology, Eco-Philosophy Centre, 1002 Granger, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104. The book can be obtained directly from the Centre at $1.50, including postage. 4. Thomas Berry has written an in-depth critique of Teilhard's unduly anthropocentric positions in 'Teilhard in the Ecological Age', Riverdale Papers, VIII, 1983. 5. Teilhard de Chardin, The Phenomenon of Man, Fontana, 1974, p. 219. 6. Jacques Monod, Le Hazard et La Necessite, Le Seuil, Paris, 1970. 7. Warwick Fox, 'On Guiding Stars to Deep Ecology', The Ecologist, Vol.14, Nos 5/6, 1984, p. 204. 8. Warwick Fox,' Deep Ecology: A New Philosophy for Our Times?' The Ecologist, Vol. 14, Nos 5/6, 1984. p. 199. 9. For a more detailed discussion of the idea of the universe as a sanctuary, see my monograph Ecological Humanism, Gryphon Press, 1977, subsequently incorporated as chapter 3 of my book on Eco-Philosophy (see note 1).

Sff^SSSsr" - ™ 0 * "CH E MALA y HOUS E

HHE MALAy HOUSE Rediscovering Malaysia's Indigenous Shelter System

Urn }ee Yuan

• 160 pages # 2 50 fullcolour photographs • 28 cm x 21 cm and 3-D drawings. • ISBN: 967-9966-05-4

Rediscovering Malaysia's Indigenous Shelter System

THE MALA Y HOUSE book brings t o yo u one o f the finest and richest components o f Malaysia's cultural heritage.

Fully illustrated b y over 250 full-colour photographs and threedimensional drawings, this book documents the architecture o f the Malay house, giving details o f the various house-types, the constructio n systems, the climatic design and the adaptations o f the house t o the social and cultural needs o f the Malays. I t also traces the many forces that are working against the survival o f this excellent housing solution.

The Malay house is extremely well designed t o suit the warm and humid Malaysian climate and also for the optimal and multi functional use o f space. I t also has a sophisticated and flexible construction system which allows the house t o be extended t o meet the growing needs o f the family.

This book is essential for those interested i n Malaysian culture, indigenous architecture and the future o f housing for people i n the Thir d World. Available from The Ecologist, Worthyvale Manor Farm, Camelford, Cornwall PL32 2TT, United Kingdom.

The Ecologist, Vol.18, Nos 4/5, 1988

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