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Ecologist

Population control for Britain? • Is there a peaceful at' Brineing order to chaos • (an we avoid a »orld fai

JULY 1970

Editorial The City Is Dead

On the occasion of The Ecologist's fifth birthday we offer readers an extra big issue with contributions from the team who launched it and the Associate editors who have supported it and written for it in those five difficult and exciting years. Changes are as inevitable in a periodical as they are in any other field. When The Ecologist first reached a surprised and tentative readership almost all of what it said was little known and even less understood. Today the national press, T. V., and radio discuss and report extensively on the environment; problems of resource shortage, pollution and world famine are recognised. Excellent magazines about selfsufficiency, alternative technology and conservation proliferate. Our role now must be to explore ways of creating a new life-style for the postindustrial age in which people will learn to live in harmony with the natural world, enhancing it instead of destroying it.

We thank those who have supported us since the beginning and welcome all who have joined us since.

JULY 1975

186

Associate Editor, Robert Allen is now working for IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources) in Switzerland.

The compulsory exodus of the citizens of Phnom Penh, two million of them in about as many days, is arguably the most significant event since Hiroshima and certainly the most instructive — not least for the almost total incomprehension with which i t has been greeted by the rest of the world. Non-Cambodians have glimpsed a rural revolution, and they are appalled.

Since its foundation five years ago, the Ecologist has advocated the revitalization of the rural community. In the December 1970 issue, for example, Edward Gold­

smith ("The Stable Society — Can We Achieve It?") argued that the only society able to make its members happy, and endure is one composed of small self-regulating cornunities clearly linked to the rest of nature. This argument was expanded in Blueprint for Survival's call for decentralization, and has continued to be a constant preoccupation of the magazine's staff and associates.

Cambodia's abandonment of the urban economy is thus of particular interest to us, and the extent to which the meagre information emerging from Cambodia is distorted